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Basic Geometry Formulas

Here is the list of geometry formulas for different geometric shapes such as flat 2D shapes and 3D shapes like spheres, cones, and prisms.  Geometry deals with the different aspects of various shapes and figures. In everyday life, we apply geometry when determining the distance we have to walk from one place to another, putting

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Blog

Watch Astronaut Instructor and Flight Controller Theresa Parks at Work

I’m an astronaut instructor and flight controller. That means that I teach astronauts all about their spacesuits and how to get ready for a spacewalk. Then, I work in Mission Control when the astronauts go on spacewalks and do all of those activities on the space station. As early as I can remember, I’ve always

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Watch Forest and Natural Resources Researcher Ellen Crocker at Work

Ellen Crocker is an Assistant Professor at the University of Kentucky in the Department of Forestry and Natural Resources. She works on a wide range of research, education, and outreach related to threats to forests and sustainable management approaches. I love talking with people about their trees and how to keep their forests healthy. I

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Watch Forensic Scientist Kelly Knight at Work

As a forensic DNA scientist, I tested evidence from crimes that occurred in the state of Maryland. I also got to research new techniques. Because I worked with evidence from crimes, a big part of my job involved going to court. I explained my tests and conclusions to lawyers, judges, and juries. This information helped

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Watch Behavioral Ecologist Researcher Rachael Bonoan at Work

Post-doctoral Researcher, Tufts University and Washington State University. This plant, which looks like a giant dandelion, is called Salsify. You can eat its roots! Hi, I’m Rachael! I’ve been studying insects for eight years, but I’ve been observing them for most of my life. As a kid, I spent summer evenings collecting June bugs, moths,

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Watch Bat Conservationist Kristen Lear Work to Help Bats

A huge part of what I do as a bat conservationist is sharing the world of bats with others!  I fell in love with bats while on night hikes during summer camp and got my first taste of bat conservation in 6th grade when I built and put up bat houses for my Girl Scout

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STEM Careers

Watch Public Health Entomologist Dr. Liz Dykstra at Work

As a public health entomologist, I focus on insects like mosquitoes, bed bugs, and hornets. I also work with other arthropods, like ticks and spiders, that can hurt people by either making them sick or injuring them by biting, stinging, or causing allergic reactions.   My job involves field and lab work ,data analysis, and communicating

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STEM Careers

Watch Food Scientist Martina Bodner at Work

My main area of interest is food fraud. Unfortunately, there are criminals who adulterate our food for economic interests. It is my job to develop new analytical techniques to detect this fraud and verify food quality. For my analysis I use mainly two techniques: spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. I think that my job is really

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Science in the news

Neon Colors Help Coral Reef Survival

The extensive bleaching of coral reefs is an alarming threat to marine ecosystems. To fight this threat, some corals are turning neon to survive. Coral reefs are the rainforests of the sea. They serve as habitats for thousands of fish and other marine creatures. For people, they provide many benefits including food, medicine, and recreation.

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Blog

Watch Particle Physicist Claire Malone at Work

I am a particle physicist. I analyze data from the Large Hadron Collider at CERN to search for as-yet undiscovered particles. As a scientist I think it is very important to explain to the public what I am looking at in my research. That is why I make my work accessible to everyone who is

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Blog

What does a Meteorologist do? Watch Meteorologist Chelsea Andrews at Work

As a meteorologist, I create my own forecast and build the graphics you see on-air. To create a forecast, I check current conditions, look at several different computer models, and use my knowledge of Central Texas weather patterns to determine what the temperatures, wind speeds, and rain chances will likely be for the next several

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Blog

Storm Photos Of The Year 2022

Heads-up, storm photographers! This year’s winners of the second annual Storm Photos of the Year competition are out. Created and organized by renowned photographer Mike Olbinsky, “The Stormys”, as the competition is called, is a celebration of the passion and dedication of storm photographers, both professionals and amateurs alike. Olbinsky hopes to recognize the skills

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Blog

Pictures That Show Climate Changes

Climate change, also called global warming, is the long-term shift in the Earth’s temperature and weather. Most scientists say that climate change is caused by man-made activities. Since the Industrial Revolution, the Earth’s temperature has risen by 1°C, as caused by human activities like deforestation, vehicle emissions, and pollution. Climate change is a serious threat

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The Colors of the Polar Regions

When you imagine the colors of the polar regions, what picture first comes to your mind? Probably thick layers of white ice extending as far as your eyes can see, right? With the temperatures reaching far below zero and the sun not shining for months in the winter, it is easy to think that the

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planetary conjunctions
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Planetary Conjunctions This Month

This April you can look up and see not one but two planetary conjunctions in the night sky. Planetary conjunctions is the term used to describe the visual phenomena where two or more celestial bodies appear to be very close to each other.  The first one happens at the beginning of the month – April

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Mycena chlorophos
Blog

Mystical Mushroom Pictures

Here’s a list of some of the most beautiful and mystical mushrooms you could ever find. Read about mushrooms that shine like a disco light, glow in the dark, or release puffs of smoke here.

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Blog

Stunning Astronomy Pictures: Winners of the ASTRO2021 Photo Contest

Everyday we hear about a lot of environmental issues that are harming humans in one way or the other. Light pollution is one of those problems. It is the excessive use of artificial outdoor lighting and has affected the world’s ecosystems and human health. Moreover, it is impossible for us to look at the wonders

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NASA Names Winners of Lunar Robotics Design Contest

NASA has chosen two students as winners of the Lunabotics Junior Contest, a national competition for K-12 students featuring the agency’s Artemis missions. Contestants were charged with designing a robot that can dig and move lunar soil, or regolith, from one area of the lunar South Pole to a holding container near a future Artemis

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Blog

Can You Get Sick in Space?

Having a cold is no fun, your throat feels scratchy, your nose gets runny, and you seem to be sneezing every few minutes. In Space, having a cold is even worse. Can you get sick in Space? In 1968, NASA’s Apollo 7 spacecraft blasted off with a three-person crew aboard. Just 15 hours into the

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science shows for kids
Blog

The 11 Best Science Shows on TV

Let’s admit it. It’s very rare to find a kid these days who does not spend time in front of a screen. While the boons and banes of screen time have long been a subject of debate, we, as guardians and parents, can at least make the inevitable screen time productive. How? By encouraging kids

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Songbirds
Science in the news

With Everyone Inside, Birds Are Singing More Quietly

When the world shut down because of the Covid-19 pandemic, the world suddenly became quieter. Birds were singing more quietly, too. Scientists found that birdsongs, particularly those of the white-crowned sparrows in San Francisco, California, became softer and more complex during the shutdown. How has noise pollution affected the birds? Before the pandemic, scientists had

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Credit-Frank Glaw
Science in the news

World’s Smallest Reptile Could Fit on Your Fingertip

Chameleons are famous for their curved tails, long tongues, and ability to change their skin color. Recently, the animals are once again in the spotlight after scientists discovered the smallest species so far. The newly discovered chameleons are now thought to be the world’s smallest reptiles.  The new species is called the nano-chameleon, or Brookesia

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Credit-Savidge et al-Current Biology
Science in the news

These Snakes Slither Up Trees – By Turning Themselves into Lassos

Scientists have discovered a new kind of snake movement. They found out that brown tree snakes can turn their bodies into lassos to climb up large, smooth surfaces like tubes or poles. The scientists were shocked by this discovery because they had never seen snakes move this way before. Credit-Savidge et al-Current Biology How do

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Blog

Infinite Chocolate Paradox

Have you heard of the saying, “You can’t have your cake and eat it too”? Well, with this infinite chocolate paradox experiment, it seems that you CAN have your cake (or chocolate!) and eat it too. This simple illusion is sure to amaze everyone! But is this trick really the secret to infinite chocolate? Infinite

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Is there an earth like planet?
Science in the news

Rocks From Space Tell Us About Other Planets

Astronomers have discovered thousands of planets outside our solar system. These are called exoplanets. Recent space rock experiments revealed that some of these planets have water in their atmospheres. This means that some of these distant planets could possibly support life. Image Credit-Carnegie Institution for Science–Conel M. O’D. Alexander Scroll Down for a Downloadable PDF of this

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Turtle poachers
Science in the news

3D-Printed Turtle Eggs Could Help Catch Poachers

Along the beaches of Costa Rica, sea turtles love to lay their eggs. But poachers also love to take these eggs and sell them to people who buy these eggs and eat them as food. All seven species of sea turtles are considered threatened. So, researchers thought of ways to prevent the eggs from being

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Naked Mole-Rats
Science in the news

Do Naked Mole-Rats Have Their Own Language?

Why did scientists want to learn about naked mole-rats and their language? Naked mole-rats are rodents that live together in underground tunnels dug in the dry and grassy areas of countries like Ethiopia, Kenya, and Somalia. The animals live in groups called colonies. A colony can have 70–290 individual mole-rats. Each colony has a queen,

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Golden tongue mummy
Science in the news

2000-Year-Old Mummy Has a Golden Tongue

Archeologists, people who study past human life and culture by examining bones, tools, etc., found a 2000-year-old mummy with a golden tongue. They found that mummy at a burial site in Alexandria, Egypt. The archeologists discovered the mummy along with 15 others at a temple dedicated to Egyptian gods Osiris and Isis. Aside from the

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Hurricane reveal die-hard lizards
Science in the news

Hurricanes Reveal Die-hard Lizards

Hurricanes are extreme natural events. Scientists expect that hurricanes will become more and more common as climate change worsens. After two back-to-back hurricanes struck Turks and Caicos, a group of small islands in the Caribbean, scientists found an example of “survival of the fittest” happening among the islands’ anole lizard population. Photo Credit: Colin Donihue

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How Do Tabby Cats Get Their Stripes?
Science in the news

How Do Tabby Cats Get Their Stripes?

Are tabby cats a breed of cat? No! “Tabby” isn’t a breed of cat, but simply describes their coat pattern. The patterns can vary from stripes to whorls to spots to patches. All these variations give a distinct appearance to the cat. However, irrespective of the patterns, all tabby cats have an “M” shaped mark

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Tardigrades water bears
Science in the news

Tardigrades, “Little Water Bears”

What are tardigrades? Tardigrades are microscopic aquatic animals that are known because of their highly tolerant nature. Tardigrades were discovered in 1773 by the German zoologist Johann August Ephraim Goeze, who dubbed them “little water bear.” Three years later, Italian biologist Lazzaro Spallanzani named the group “Tardigrada,” or “slow stepper.” Tardigrades are also called “moss

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Human Footprints New Mexico
Science in the news

Human Footprints Found in New Mexico

When did humans first walk in North America? Archaeologists used to think that humans first walked through the continents of North and South America when the Ice Age began to end. As the snow caps and glaciers melted, humans started migrating from Africa towards Australia, Europe, Asia, and America. Archaeologists found tools, needles, and spear

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Snake
Science in the news

The Asteroid That Killed the Dinosaurs May Have Been Lucky for Snakes

There are a million interesting facts about snakes, but in this article, we talk about the origin of these captivating animals. From mighty pythons to massive boa constrictors, from rattlesnakes to vipers, how did they come to slither this Earth?  When does the story begin? A massive asteroid hit the Mexican Yucatan Peninsula 66 million

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Science in the news

Volcano Eruption in La Palma, Spain

La Palma is a volcanic ocean island located in the Canary archipelagos in Spain. The Cumbre Vieja or “Old Peak” is an active volcano in the southern part of La Palma. This island is known for its active volcanic activity. Ever since its last eruptions in 1949 and 1971, the volcano had been silent. However,

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Science in the news

Can Worms Hear?

What worms are these? These are roundworms that are used for biological research. Their scientific name is Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans). These worms are about a millimeter long and are used for studying different sensations like smell, touch, and taste. However, very recently these animals have displayed a new sensation: audition or hearing capability.  

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Dinosaur Fossils
Science in the news

Baby Dinosaur Fossils Show That Some Dino Families Called the Arctic Home

In what environment did dinosaurs live? The majority of dinosaurs that have been discovered lived along old rivers or streams. They were mighty animals that required resources in large quantities. They inhabited forests and roamed the forested floodplains, thickly vegetated swamps, and lakes that surrounded them. Some of the dinosaurs also lived in ancient deserts.

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Fungus clothes
Science in the news

Would You Wear These Fungus Clothes?

What is a fungus? These are organisms that include yeasts and molds as well as mushrooms. Like plants, fungi cells have a rigid wall around them. However, there are differences between the cell wall of a plant and that of a fungus. The cell wall of plants is mostly made of cellulose, whereas the cell

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Human ancestor
Science in the news

The ‘Dragon Man’ Could Be the Closest Human Ancestor

Millions of years ago, humans appeared on this planet. The Ardipithecus is the earliest known human ancestor. Over the course of 5 million years, several human species evolved. In this article, we discuss the most recent human ancestor, whose skull has been discovered recently! Image Credit: Kai Geng What is the discovery? The well-preserved skull

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Science in the news

Ant Robots: Swarms of Ants Have Inspired Robots

Why choose ants as an inspiration for designing robots?​ It is often said that humans are social animals. But have you ever wondered if there are other animals that are known for their social behavior? Yes, there are! Ants, termites, bees, butterflies, and moths are all especially social animals. This means that these animals always

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Ecosphere
Blog

7 Awesome Gifts Ideas for Your Holiday Wishlist This Year

With the holidays just around the corner, we’re pretty sure you’re on the lookout for awesome items to add to your wish list this year. Here are 7 gift ideas to help you complete your list: 1. Ecosphere Fancy having an entire ecosystem right inside your bedroom? This self-sustaining ecosystem that utilizes NASA technology doubles

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Halloween Books
Uncategorized

Halloween Books for Kids : An Interesting Twist

Halloween Books for Kids can be a turning point this season. With Halloween fast approaching, parents are torn between allowing their children to go trick-or-treating or staying in to minimize the spread of the coronavirus. As CNN points out, nothing is exactly back to 2019. Although children over the age of 12 can be vaccinated and going

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NASA
Blog

NASA Seeks Student Tech Ideas for Suborbital Launch

NASA is calling on all sixth through 12th-grade educators and students to submit experiments for possible suborbital flights as a way of gaining firsthand experience with the design and testing process used by NASA researchers. The NASA TechRise Student Challenge invites students to design, build, and launch experiments on suborbital rockets and high-altitude balloons. The

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Parental Resources

Best Resources for Social Emotional Learning

The importance of creating an environment that fosters social emotional learning both at home and in the classroom can’t be overlooked. Many educators face obstacles daily in their classrooms because of their student’s lack of social emotional skills. The reality is many teachers feel they spend more time dealing with social emotional issues than they

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Constellations
Blog

Easy Constellations to Find: MAPPING THE NIGHT SKIES

Here are 7 easy constellations to find next time that you are out stargazing. For this blog, we have picked 7 major constellations from both the Northern and Southern hemispheres: Ursa Major, Cassiopeia, Orion, Canis Major, Centaurus, Crux, and Carina 1. Ursa Major/Big Dipper – Best time to see: April The best way to locate

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Learning About Electronics: STEM Electronics Kits
Blog

Learning About Electronics: How You Can Get Started

Your child belongs to a generation born into advanced technology. Compared to those of us who had to live with dial-up connections and CDs before eventually entering the era of the Netflix and Amazons of this world, they will be growing up around even faster and more advanced technologies that have endless possibilities. So if

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Fireworks
Fun Science

How Do Fireworks Work: The Art and Science Behind It

I’ve always been fascinated by fireworks and how cool they look exploding up in the sky in different colors and shapes, especially when they are perfectly timed with the music. It all combines together to make for a really magical experience. Read on to learn all about the history, engineering, art, and science of fireworks.

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Summer Activity
Parental Resources

Fun Summer Activities for Kids During This Pandemic

Perfectly clear blue skies, bright bursts of sunshine, hot sweaty weather, and kids with nothing to do all day. To help make this summer worthwhile and memorable for you and your family, we’ve come up with a list of 10 indoor and outdoor activities that will surely be fun and engaging for everyone.

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Blog

Easy Science Experiments To Do at Home

We have rounded up some simple and fun experiments for children to do at home afterschool. Hands-on experiments are a great way for children to satisfy their curiosity and answer their own questions about the world. We hope this list gives you some great ideas for fun hands-on experiments at home. If you are looking for ready

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Videos

Do you want to be a science illustrator?

See what it takes to become a science illustrator. Ever thought that art and science could be the perfect mix? As a science illustrator, you will be able to blend these two fields so well together.

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Videos

What causes Brain Freeze?

Do you know what causes brain freeze”? That unpleasant pain you might feel in your head after eating some ice cream or inhaling your milkshake too fast?

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Parental Resources

Tips for Online Classes Success: 6 Home Learning Tools

Keeping the kids happy, healthy and learning at home during this lockdown period is a challenge to say the least! Here is why we think e-learning could be the next big thing, and how to make sure you set your kids up for success learning online from home.

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Videos

Virus vs Bacteria: What’s the Difference?

Difference between Virus and Bacteria Both viruses and bacteria are microbes and can cause diseases in humans. While they share some similarities, they are also very different. Here are some of the ways that they differ from each other. The main difference between bacteria and virus is that bacteria are living cells, capable of reproducing and surviving on

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Videos

Shark Myths: Busting Them All

We are here to bust the most 10 common shark myths? Confused? Let’s have a look at it Sharks bite people a lot Shark bites are probably rarer than you think. You are more likely to be killed by a cow or a falling vending machine than a shark. This is one of the most

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STEM Careers

Astronomy For Kids: Know An Astronomer

Who Is Emily Levesque? It was 1986 and Halley’s comet was making its once-in-every-75-years journey past the Earth. Two-year-old Emily was out in the backyard watching with her family. One look up at the star-studded sky and little Emily was hooked! Looking at the stars has since grown from a personal fascination into a career.

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Blog

Citizen Science Projects for Students to Participate Today

Hey kids! You do not have to wait until you are older to make a difference in this world by participating in these citizen science projects for students. You can do it right now! See how you can participate in science experiments and data gathering to help real scientists answer some very important questions. Here

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Parental Resources

How To Excel At Math and Science Using 10 Tips

We all have what it takes to excel in areas that don’t seem to come naturally to us at first and learning them does not have to be as painful as we might think! Like Math and Science. Here are 10 tips that can help you get better at math and science

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Science like a Girl

Science Like A Girl: Danielle Feinberg on Computer Science & Animation

Danielle Feinberg knows what magic feels like. As Director of Photography for Lighting for Pixar Animation Studios, she breathes life into the worlds and characters of movies like Coco, Brave, Wall E, and more. In Danielle’s life, creating magic means finding a way to be be an artist and a scientist at the same time. 

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Magazine

Smart Goals For Kids: Fulfill Them with Smore Guide

You don’t have to choose between different things you like to do. It is possible to follow many different interests and get really good at all of them. Based on a very inspirational interview with Merritt Moore who is a quantum physicist and a professional ballet dancer we put together a short guide on how to go about achieving your goals. We hope this helps you stay motivated to work towards all your dreams.

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STEM Activities

Smore Summer of STEM Challenge #2

Have you ever looked at a plastic bag and knew it could be so much more? Now is your chance. Enter your winning repurposed plastic bag designs for a chance to win big!

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STEM Activities

Smore Summer of Stem Challenge # 1

We are super excited to host the Smore Summer of STEM challenge where we challenge you to show us your brilliant creations and you get a chance to win some cool prizes. This weeks challenge is SUPER SLIDES!! CHALLENGE DETAILS Design and construct a water slide Maximum use of recycled materials is encouraged The design must

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Parental Resources

Printable: Summer of STEM Supply List

Summer is almost here. If you are worried about the summer slump and already looking for ideas to keep your kids’ minds sharp and curious all through summer, STEM maker challenges are the way to go. These challenges are fun to do and help keep the kids engaged in scientific inquiry, creative thinking and problem

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Parental Resources

Earth Day Crafts Using Recycled Materials

Gather the kids and get crafty this Earth-Day! We have rounded up some great crafts to get you inspired to find more uses for what you (in many cases) already have and turn that trash into treasure.

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Blog

Marine Biology For Kids: Things You Have To Do

When you tell someone you’re a marine biologist no one seems to quite know what to do with this information. In my time as a marine biologist, I’ve gotten some strange comments regarding my career. It appears that, along the way, people have gathered some misconceptions about marine scientists. In marine biology for kids here are

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Uncategorized

Nerdy Nuts Coupon: Super Cute & Nerdy!

Looking for cute and nerdy nuts coupon to send with your kids to school this Valentines day? We have the perfect ones for you! Plus we are giving them away to you for FREE! So go ahead and print as many as you need. Give out these super cute animal cards paired with a little

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Developing Skills
Parental Resources

STEM Activities For Kids: 5 Things To Develop Skills

Encourage children to think about where they are in space: if they’re looking at a map of the zoo, ask them where they are in relation to the kangaroos or lions. Educators and researchers agree early literacy experiences are important for children’s cognitive and language development. For the past 30 years, there has been a

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Uncategorized

Making a difference: Melissa Cristina Marquez

Melissa Christina Márquez loves being a champion for misunderstood creatures. She is a marine biologist and founder of the Fins United Initiative. She spends her days studying sharks and challenging preconceived notions. Melissa wants everyone to see beyond stereotypes, whether for her finned friends or her fellow women in STEM.  Melissa’s love of science started

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Science like a Girl

Science Like A Girl: Marine Biologist Melissa Marquez

Melissa Christina MÃrquez loves being a champion for misunderstood creatures. She is a marine biologist
She spends her days studying sharks and challenging preconceived notions. Melissa wants everyone to see beyond stereotypes, whether for her finned friends or her fellow women in STEM.

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Science like a Girl

Science Like A Girl: Astronomer Emily Levesque

It was 1986 and Halley’s comet was making its once-in-every-75-years journey past the Earth. Two-year-old Emily was out in the backyard watching with her family. One look up at the star-studded sky and little Emily was hooked! Looking at the stars has since grown from a personal fascination into a career. That little girl is

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Uncategorized

Meet the MUSHROOM MESSENGERS

When you see a mushroom, you see only a teeny tiny part of a HUGE living thing. The rest of it is underground. The underground part is called a mycelium. Two or more are called Mycelia. A mycelium looks like a bunch of tiny tubes as thin as hair. One mycelium can have so many of them

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